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The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson (Volume 4) Sæmundr fróði

The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson (Volume 4)

Sæmundr fróði

Published
ISBN : 9781458878861
Paperback
170 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: ... 36. Strifes and fierce enmities thinkMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: ... 36. Strifes and fierce enmities think not to be lulled, no more than deadly injury. Wisdom and fame in arms a prince not easily acquires, who shall of men be foremost. 37. This I counsel thee eleventhly: that thou at evil look, what course it may take. A long life, it seems to me the prince may not enjoy---fierce disputes will arise. Sigurd said: A wiser mortal exists not, and I swear that I will possess thee, for thou art after my heart. She answered: Thee I will have before all others, though I have to choose among all men. And this they confirmed with oaths to each other. FRAGMENTS OF THE LAY OF SIGURD AND BRYNHILD.1 sigurd then rides away from Hindarfiall, and journeys on till he comes to the habitation of Heimir, who was married to Beckhild, Brynhilds sister. Alsvid, Heimirs son, who was at play when Sigurd arrived at the mansion, received him kindly, and requested him to stay with him. Sigurd consented, and remained there a short time. Brynhild was at that time with Heimir, and was weaving within a gold border the great exploits of Sigurd. iThose fragments from the Volsunga-Saga. which are inserted in some paper manuscripts of the Edda, and containing matter probably derived from the lost poems relative to Sigurd and Brynhild, are printed in the Stockholm edition of the Edda. They are also given by Afzelius in his Swedish version, and partially in Danish by Finn Magnusen in his edition. A complete translation into Danish of the entire Saga has since been given by Prof. Rafn at Copenhagen. One day, when Sigurd was come from the forest, his hawk flew to the window at which Brynhild sat employed on weaving. Sigurd ran after it, saw the.lady, and appeared struck with her handiwork and beauty. On the following day Sigurd went to her apartment, and A...