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The Curse of Kehama Robert Southey

The Curse of Kehama

Robert Southey

Published
ISBN : 9781230299518
Paperback
52 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ...Like to a light fastMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ...Like to a light fast lockd in lanthorn dark, Whereby by night our wary steps we guide In slabby streets, and dirty channels mark, Some weaker rays through the black top do glide, And flusher streams, perhaps, from horny side- But when weve past the peril of the way, ArrivM at home, and laid that case aside, --The naked light how clearly doth it ray, And spread its joyful beams as bright as summers day. Even so the soul, in this contracted state, Confind to these strait instruments of sense, More dull and narrowly doth operate- At this hole hears, --the sight must ray from thence, --Here tastes, there smells---but when shes gone from hence, Like naked lamp she is one shining sphere, And round about has perfect cognoscence, Whateer in her horizon doth appear. She is one orb of sense, all eye, all airy ear. Amid the uncouth allegory, and more uncouth language, of this strange series of poems, a few passages are to be found of exceeding beauty. Milton, who was the authors friend, had evidently read them. Undying as I am!--II. p. 13. The Soul is not a thing of which a man may say, it hath been, it is about to be, or is to be hereafter- for it is a thing without birth- it is ancient, constant, and eternal, and is not to be destroyed in this its mortal frame. How can the man who believeth that this thing is incorruptible, eternal, inexhaustible, and without birth, think that he can either kill or cause it to be killed! As a man throweth away old garments and putteth on new, even so the Soul, having quitted its old mortal frames, enter-eth into others which are new. The weapon divideth it not, the fire burneth it not, the water corrupteth it not, the wind drieth it not away---for it is indivisible, inconsumable, incorruptible, and is not to.